How can I run a directive after the dom has finished rendering?

The question:

I’ve got a seemingly simple problem with no apparent (by reading the Angular JS docs) solution.

I have got an Angular JS directive that does some calculations based on other DOM elements’ height to define the height of a container in the DOM.

Something similar to this is going on inside the directive:

return function(scope, element, attrs) {
    $('.main').height( $('.site-header').height() -  $('.site-footer').height() );
}

The issue is that when the directive runs, $('site-header') cannot be found, returning an empty array instead of the jQuery wrapped DOM element I need.

Is there a callback that I can use within my directive that only runs after the DOM has been loaded and I can access other DOM elements via the normal jQuery selector style queries?

The Solutions:

Below are the methods you can try. The first solution is probably the best. Try others if the first one doesn’t work. Senior developers aren’t just copying/pasting – they read the methods carefully & apply them wisely to each case.

Method 1

It depends on how your $(‘site-header’) is constructed.

You can try to use $timeout with 0 delay. Something like:

return function(scope, element, attrs) {
    $timeout(function(){
        $('.main').height( $('.site-header').height() -  $('.site-footer').height() );
    });        
}

Explanations how it works: one, two.

Don’t forget to inject $timeout in your directive:

.directive('sticky', function($timeout)

Method 2

Here is how I do it:

app.directive('example', function() {

    return function(scope, element, attrs) {
        angular.element(document).ready(function() {
                //MANIPULATE THE DOM
        });
    };

});

Method 3

Probably the author won’t need my answer anymore. Still, for sake of completeness i feel other users might find it useful. The best and most simple solution is to use $(window).load() inside the body of the returned function. (alternatively you can use document.ready. It really depends if you need all the images or not).

Using $timeout in my humble opinion is a very weak option and may fail in some cases.

Here is the complete code i’d use:

.directive('directiveExample', function(){
   return {
       restrict: 'A',
       link: function($scope, $elem, attrs){

           $(window).load(function() {
               //...JS here...
           });
       }
   }
});

Method 4

there is a ngcontentloaded event, I think you can use it

.directive('directiveExample', function(){
   return {
       restrict: 'A',
       link: function(scope, elem, attrs){

                $$window = $ $window


                init = function(){
                    contentHeight = elem.outerHeight()
                    //do the things
                }

                $$window.on('ngcontentloaded',init)

       }
   }
});

Method 5

If you can’t use $timeout due to external resources and cant use a directive due to a specific issue with timing, use broadcast.

Add $scope.$broadcast("variable_name_here"); after the desired external resource or long running controller/directive has completed.

Then add the below after your external resource has loaded.

$scope.$on("variable_name_here", function(){ 
   // DOM manipulation here
   jQuery('selector').height(); 
}

For example in the promise of a deferred HTTP request.

MyHttpService.then(function(data){
   $scope.MyHttpReturnedImage = data.image;
   $scope.$broadcast("imageLoaded");
});

$scope.$on("imageLoaded", function(){ 
   jQuery('img').height(80).width(80); 
}

Method 6

I had the a similar problem and want to share my solution here.

I have the following HTML:

<div data-my-directive>
  <div id='sub' ng-include='includedFile.htm'></div>
</div>

Problem: In the link-function of directive of the parent div I wanted to jquery’ing the child div#sub. But it just gave me an empty object because ng-include hadn’t finished when link function of directive ran. So first I made a dirty workaround with $timeout, which worked but the delay-parameter depended on client speed (nobody likes that).

Works but dirty:

app.directive('myDirective', [function () {
    var directive = {};
    directive.link = function (scope, element, attrs) {
        $timeout(function() {
            //very dirty cause of client-depending varying delay time 
            $('#sub').css(/*whatever*/);
        }, 350);
    };
    return directive;
}]);

Here’s the clean solution:

app.directive('myDirective', [function () {
    var directive = {};
    directive.link = function (scope, element, attrs) {
        scope.$on('$includeContentLoaded', function() {
            //just happens in the moment when ng-included finished
            $('#sub').css(/*whatever*/);
        };
    };
    return directive;
}]);

Maybe it helps somebody.


All methods was sourced from stackoverflow.com or stackexchange.com, is licensed under cc by-sa 2.5, cc by-sa 3.0 and cc by-sa 4.0

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